Training-Games.com
Issue 19
 
Learning CAN be fun. Training SHOULD be fun. Training Games ARE fun!
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Happy New Year from TGI

In this Newsletter...
 

Different Strokes
I wanted to talk about different learning styles in this newsletter, because I came across a Learning Modality Self-Assessment instrument, presented by Robert W. Lucas in his book, The Creative Training Idea Book. I thought you might enjoy reviewing and perhaps using this instrument in your training classes. Lucas' book, The Creative Training Idea Book, is filled with active training ideas, with chapters on brain-based learning, creating a stimulating learning environment and engaging and energizing learners.

In 1983, David Kolb (Silberman, Active Training, 3rd Edition) identified four distinct learning styles. These he labeled Accommodating, Diverging, Assimilating, and Converging. Mel Silberman in his book, Active Training, contrasts each of Kolb's learning styles, by indicating how an individual exemplifying each style might go about learning a new card game.

Accommodators, Silberman tells us, like controlled experimentation, and in this regard would opt to play a simulated practice game to learn. I thought this was the methodology everyone used when it came to learning card games? Not so, Divergers, according to Kolb, are risk takers and prefer to jump right in and play, learning as they go. I would imagine you would need a great deal of confidence in your ability to learn quickly if you were one of Kolb's Divergers. I know that I am one to watch and analyze before I'm ready to play. This is because I am afraid of appearing like I don't know what I'm doing, and I am only confident of the fact that, early on, I really wouldn't know much and probably would get it all wrong. In this regard Kolb would call me a Converger - one who would prefers to figure things out quietly using their own reasoning ability by first watching the practice round. Finally Kolb identifies the Assimilator, who solves problems through inductive reasoning. Assimilators want to be comfortably guided to the correct answers, so they might first grab the game's instruction manual and read it cover to cover. Only then might they choose to jump into a real game.

Abraham Maslow, many years ago, (1968) presented us with a Human Needs hierarchy. He pointed out that we have two sets of needs, one for growth and the other for safety. Maslow informs us that our need to feel safe and secure must always be met before we will reach for growth or try something new. This appears to coincide with Kolb's look at different learning styles. It should be of interest to trainers however, that an element of learning certainly appears to be the level of safety learners are experiencing.

Perhaps a different take on different learning modalities has us look at the very way in which learners wish to be served new information. Learners may prefer, visual, auditory or kinesthetic instructive methods. Visual learners like sequenced presentation, videos and demonstrations. They prefer to write information down, so naturally they are big note takers. Visual learners use their eyes primarily to take in information, so like the folks from the great State of Missouri, the "Show Me State", seeing is believing. Contrast them with auditory learners, who are less likely even to look up during a lecture. Auditory learners rely on listening to learn and remember. They may also be talkative in class, which is a way to reinforce or rephrase learning simply by hearing themselves talk about the topic.

Kinesthetic learners, on the other hand, want to learn by doing, and are impulsive to get active and involved in the subject matter. They prefer group activities, role playing, and want to touch and feel their way to understanding. And as you've probably suspected, most of us use a combination of these learning styles versus simply relying on one. Research by Grinder (1991), found "In every group of 30 people, an average of 22 are able to learn effectively as long as the instructor provides a blend of visual, auditory and kinesthetic activity" (Silberman, Active Training, Third Edition). The remaining 8 people are highly reliant on one learning style, and consequently, find it difficult trying to understand information presented using other modalities.

It also appears that preferred learning styles may also be changing for new generations. Research by Schroeder tells us that younger generations appear to have a distinct preference for active learning. Sixty percent have a practical versus theoretical orientation to learning, and prefer "concrete and active" experience over "abstract and reflective" learning by a ratio of five to one.

Here is Learning Modality Self Assessment Instrument shown by Locus (The Creative Training Idea Book, p. 55).

LEARNING MODALITY SELF–ASSESSMENT
Robert W. Lucas The Creative Training Idea Book

1. In the Preferred Behavior Column Place an (X)
2. In the "Style Category Column place A, V, or K based on below table.
3. Add the number of A, V, and Ks and place that in space indicated below.
  Style
Category
Preferred
Behavior
 
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Like to touch and handle things when looking at them
Spell well
Like to listen to books on tape
Enjoy reading books
Verbal directions alone confuse me
Enjoy background music while working on a project
Would rather discuss a topic than read about it
Prefer use of colors and colored paper on handouts
Enjoy writing
Often talk to myself
Like working with my hands
Good athlete
Enjoy jigsaw puzzles
Have a lot of nervous energy (tapping pencils, fingers, etc)
Remember jokes, stories and conversations
Collect things
Comprehend information better if reading aloud
Can read maps well
Doodle or draw pictures
Uses finger as pointer when reading
Like games, role plays, and simulation activities
Use rhymes and jingles to remember things
Get meaning from others body language and facial
expression
Good at locating things or places
Take a lot of notes during a lecture
Easily interpret and understand messages received orally
Follow written instructions well
Talk rapidly and use hands to communicate
Like to take things apart and put them together
Enjoy talking to others on the telephone
       
  A EQUALS 3, 7, 9, 10, 15, 17,20, 22, 26, 30
  V EQUALS 2, 4, 5, 8, 13, 18, 19, 23, 25, 27
  K EQUALS 1, 6, 11, 12, 14, 16, 21, 24, 28, 29

A___________ V___________ K___________

The letter with the highest number after it is your highest learning style or modality. The second highest score indicates your back-up style or secondary preference. If you have equal ratings, you are likely to shift between styles given the particular activity.

Download the self assessment as a Word document. Click Here


What's New at TGI
FREE PARTY GAMES DVD Several years ago TGI produced a fun, Party Games DVD (for ages 18 years of age and older). The idea was somewhat unique. They are games that can be played during a party through your television set (operated with your TV remote). We sold quite a few of these for $12.99 however still have several 100 left in inventory. As many of you know, almost all of the games we sell are for use by trainers and teachers. Since we are no longer in the "Party Games" business we thought it might be nice to offer these to new and past customers. So if you've purchased from TGI in the past, or plan a purchase in the future and would also like a FREE Party Games DVD, just drop me an e-mail and I will send it on to you (Again at NO CHARGE, Happy New Year from TGI!)

New PowerPoint Presentation Game TGI is about to launch our latest product called the PowerPoint Presentation Game. In short, this game enables you to turn your PowerPoint Presentation into a game. The game allows you to easily add automatic scoring, fun sounds, and random team, question and game point selectors to your presentation. In this way, as you present, you can involve your audience in a fun and engaging game. This application will be available on our website next month. Click Here for a brief overview of the TGI PowerPoint Presentation Game.

Products From TGI
Contact [email protected] or call 602-750-7223

Deal? Game XF
Deal Game Ultima
Our Deal? Game XF is based on the popular television show "Deal or No Deal" except that participants must answer your training questions to keep the values they choose. Add this great game to your training program! All the excitement, sounds and tough decisions of the real game!

Will they take a chance and buy the Lockbox or play it safe and take the offer?


For full game features description, go to: www.training-games.com/deal_game.html
(Single User License $ 99.99)

Download free demo game NOW!

A Bit About Our Brain
  1. The human brain is about 2% of your total body weight.
  2. On average our brains weigh about 3 pounds.
  3. The cerebral cortex is a sheet of tissue that makes up the outer layer of the brain and is responsible for major brain functions including thought, voluntary movement, language, reasoning and perception.
  4. The word "cortex" comes from the Latin word for "bark" (of a tree). It is comprised of a sheet of tissue which has been compacted to fit inside our skull forming "bumps" and "fissures". If unfurled, our cerebral cortex would stretch to 324 square inches, about the size of a full sheet of newspaper.
  5. Phineas P. Gage (1823 May 21, 1860) was a railroad construction foreman who suffered a traumatic brain injury when a tamping iron accidentally passed through his skull, damaging the frontal lobes of his brain. The three foot (1 m) long tamping iron with a diameter of 1.25 inches (3.2 cm) weighing thirteen and a half pounds (6.12 kg) entered his skull below his left cheek bone and exited after passing through the anterior frontal cortex and white matter. Gage regained consciousness within a few minutes, was able to speak, and survived a 45-minute ride back to his boarding house while sitting in a cart. (From Wikipedia)
  6. Neurologist Paul MacLean created The Triune or Three Brain Theory - a distinct evolutionary stratum that has formed upon the older layer before it. MacLean likened these three brains as three interconnected biological computers, [each] with its own special intelligence. The Neocortex or neo-mammalian brain for (higher level processing), the limbic or paleo-mammalian system (emotions and memory), and the reptilian brain containing the brainstem and cerebellum (autonomic functions such as breathing and heart beat).

TGI PowerPoint Icebreaker & Team Builder Game
Here are six great PowerPoint games that can be used in the classroom or for online training, including:
Fun Feud
Match Game
1,000,000 Pyramid
Star Cruiser
Ice Breaker Wheel Game
Team Builder Crossword Puzzle

All the games will help break the ice, get teams working together and help people get to know each other.

Single User Lifetime License $99.99
More Info or Buy Now

TGI's New Affiliate Program
It's easier than ever to sell Training Games products and earn a generous 43% commission with our new affiliate program offered through E-Junkie. Simply copy and paste product links into your website. Those links direct prospective buyers to the Training Games site. Any product sold to a buyer that originated from your site will earn you 43% of their purchase. A sophisticated tracking system sends you an email each time you generate a sale. You can also log into your affiliate account at any time for detailed reports on your sales. To see an example of an affiliate site selling our training games, visit GamesForTrainers.com.

Click here for more information or to enroll as an affiliate.

Famous Quotes
Mark Twain - "Training is everything. The peach was once a bitter almond; cauliflower is nothing but cabbage with a college education."

John Naisbitt - "In a world that is constantly changing, there is no one subject or set of subjects that will serve you for the foreseeable future, let alone for the rest of your life. The most important skill to acquire now is learning how to learn."

David Hume - "The sweetest and most inoffensive path of life leads through the avenues of science and learning; and whoever can either remove any obstruction in this way, or open up any new prospect, ought, so far, to be esteemed a benefactor to mankind."


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Training Games Inc.
Gary Trotta, CEO
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Cave Creek, AZ 85331
602-750-7223
[email protected]
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